purplesage

What is purple sage?


Sage is an herbal medicine used to treat upset stomach with gas, diarrhea, and swelling and redness of the gums or throat. It may also lower blood sugar and help breastfeeding women who are making too much milk.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com
Also known as sage, purple
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purple sage information from trusted sources:

Purple sage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Purple sage. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to: navigation, search. One kind of "purple sage", Salvia dorrii. Purple sage has various uses, ...

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purple sage

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ISU Extension News Release

Jun 5, 2003 ... The common names of salvia, blue sage or blue salvia easily ... 'Purple rain' salvia, S. verticillata, has become popular in recent years. ...

danshen : Information on Uses, Dosage & Side Effects on Healthline.com

3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-lactic acid, caffeic acid, Ch'ih Shen (scarlet sage), ... red sage root, red saye root, roots of purple sage, Salvia bowelyana, ...

Read more on www.healthline.com

Writer of the purple sage.

by SM Brooks - 1969

Read more on www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Addiction Treatment - Purple Sage Herbs & Gifts in Middletown ...

Feb 24, 2011 ... Purple Sage Herbs & Gifts. Address: 41 West Main St Middletown, DE USA 19709; Phone: (302) 378-2123; Email: no email ...

Arches National Park - Poliomintha incana

Rosemary Mint (Purple Sage; Sand Mint). Poliomintha incana. Family: Lamiaceae (A Utah Flora – Labiatae) – Mint Family. Aromatic shrubs; strong minty or sage ...

Read more on www.nps.gov

Sage Root Herb Uses | LIVESTRONG.COM

It is also called garden sage, purple sage and Dalmatian sage. Applied Health states its scientific name, Salvia, is derived from the Latin meaning "to heal ...

Read more on www.livestrong.com

Contents

Stretch marks
Stretch marks (striae) are pink, reddish or purplish indented streaks that often appear on the abdomen, breasts, upper arms, buttocks and thighs. Stretch marks are very common in pregnant women, especially during the last half of pregnancy.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Chinese Licorice
Licorice is a perennial erect branching plant 3-7 feet tall, the woody rootstock is wrinkled and brown on the outside, yellow on the inside, and tastes sweet. The stem, which is round on the lower part and angular higher up, bears alternate, odd-pinnate leaves with 3-7 pairs of ovate, dark green leaflets. Axillary racemes of yellowish or purplish 3-foot-long spikes of flowers appear from June to August, depending on location. Full sun to partial shade. The roots are dug when sweetest, in autumn of the 4th year, preferably from plants that have not borne fruit, a process that exhausts the sweetness of the sap. Another variety of licorice is Wild Licorice (Glycyrrhiza lepidota). It can be used like G. glabra. Wild licorice can raise blood pressure like G. glabra.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com
Lu Hui
The aloe is a perennial plant, the strong, fibrous root produces a rosette of fleshy basal leaves as in the agave but considerably smaller. The narrow-lanceolate leaves are 1-2 feet long and whitish-green on both sides, and they bear spiny teeth on the margins. The yellow to purplish, drooping flowers, which are evident most of the year, grow in a long raceme at the top of a flower stalk up to 4 1/2 feet high. The fruit is a triangular capsule containing numerous seeds. Other varieties: Bombay aloes (Aloe socotrina), not to be taken during pregnancy, used similarly to aloe vera. Aloe perryi (or Bombay aloe, Turkey aloe, Zanzibar aloe), found on the island of Socotra near the entrance of the Gulf of Aden. This is used like aloe vera, although considered by some to be less powerful. Aloe saponaria, found in South Africa, natives use the leaf pulp and yellow juice for ringworm. Aloe tenuior, found in South Africa, natives use a decoction of the root for tapeworm. Aloe latifolia, found in South Africa, some natives use the leaf pulp to treat inflamed boils (SEE BOILS) and sores, others use the leaf pulp and the plant's yellow juice to cure ringworm.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com
Yasti Madhu
Licorice is a perennial erect branching plant 3-7 feet tall, the woody rootstock is wrinkled and brown on the outside, yellow on the inside, and tastes sweet. The stem, which is round on the lower part and angular higher up, bears alternate, odd-pinnate leaves with 3-7 pairs of ovate, dark green leaflets. Axillary racemes of yellowish or purplish 3-foot-long spikes of flowers appear from June to August, depending on location. Full sun to partial shade. The roots are dug when sweetest, in autumn of the 4th year, preferably from plants that have not borne fruit, a process that exhausts the sweetness of the sap. Another variety of licorice is Wild Licorice (Glycyrrhiza lepidota). It can be used like G. glabra. Wild licorice can raise blood pressure like G. glabra.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com
Morphea
Morphea is a skin condition that causes reddish or purplish patches on your skin. The condition typically appears on your torso, arms and legs. Morphea occurs in all age groups and both sexes, but generally affects women more than men.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Common bean
The Kidney bean is an annual, twining plant, the leaves are alternate, each leaf consisting of 3 broad-ovate to rhombic-ovate, entire, pointed leaflets. The white, yellow or purplish flowers grow in sparse, axillary clusters. The fruit is a green or yellow pod, the color of the seeds, or beans, depends on the variety. Diverse as they are, all the beans named above are varieties of the kidney bean. The dry beans are picked when mature, the others at various stages of maturity.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com
Bean
The Kidney bean is an annual, twining plant, the leaves are alternate, each leaf consisting of 3 broad-ovate to rhombic-ovate, entire, pointed leaflets. The white, yellow or purplish flowers grow in sparse, axillary clusters. The fruit is a green or yellow pod, the color of the seeds, or beans, depends on the variety. Diverse as they are, all the beans named above are varieties of the kidney bean. The dry beans are picked when mature, the others at various stages of maturity.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com
Port-wine stain
A port-wine stain is a birthmark in which swollen blood vessels create a reddish-purplish discoloration of the skin.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Common Bugloss
Borage is a self-seeding annual plant, the hollow, bristly, branched and spreading stem grows up to 2 feet tall. The leaves are bristly, oval or oblong-lanceolate, the basal ones forming a rosette and the others growing alternately on the stem and branches. The striking, blue or purplish, star-shaped flowers grow in loose racemes from June to August. Bees are very fond of borage.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com
Barbados aloe
The aloe is a perennial plant, the strong, fibrous root produces a rosette of fleshy basal leaves as in the agave but considerably smaller. The narrow-lanceolate leaves are 1-2 feet long and whitish-green on both sides, and they bear spiny teeth on the margins. The yellow to purplish, drooping flowers, which are evident most of the year, grow in a long raceme at the top of a flower stalk up to 4 1/2 feet high. The fruit is a triangular capsule containing numerous seeds. Other varieties: Bombay aloes (Aloe socotrina), not to be taken during pregnancy, used similarly to aloe vera. Aloe perryi (or Bombay aloe, Turkey aloe, Zanzibar aloe), found on the island of Socotra near the entrance of the Gulf of Aden. This is used like aloe vera, although considered by some to be less powerful. Aloe saponaria, found in South Africa, natives use the leaf pulp and yellow juice for ringworm. Aloe tenuior, found in South Africa, natives use a decoction of the root for tapeworm. Aloe latifolia, found in South Africa, some natives use the leaf pulp to treat inflamed boils (SEE BOILS) and sores, others use the leaf pulp and the plant's yellow juice to cure ringworm.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com
Artichoke
Artichoke is a perennial plant, its tuberous root produces a stem from 3-5 feet high, with alternate, thistle-like leaves that are grayish-green above and woolly white underneath. The blue flowers are enveloped in the familiar globular heads of purplish-green, spiny scales which terminate the main branches. The flower heads, picked before maturity, are the dinner table vegetable fare. Flowering time varies from spring to mid-summer, depending on the warmth of the climate.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com