reactivearthritis

What is reactive arthritis?


Signs and symptoms of reactive arthritis may last three to 12 months. However, many people can control their signs and symptoms with treatment and return to their normal routine within two to six months of the onset of reactive arthritis.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Also known as Reiter Syndrome, reiter's syndrome, Reiters Disease, arthritis, reactive, Reiter Disease, Reiter's Disease, Post Infectious Arthritis, Post-Infectious Arthritis, Reactive Arthritides, Postinfectious Arthritis, Postinfectious Arthritides, Post-Infectious Arthritides
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reactive arthritis information from trusted sources:

Reactive arthritis

Reactive arthritis is a condition triggered by an infection that occurs in another part of your body most often your intestines, genitals or urinary tract.

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Reactive arthritis

Reactive arthritis is a group of inflammatory conditions that involves the joints, urethra, and eyes. There may also be sores (lesions) on the skin and mucus membranes.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Reactive arthritis

Reactive arthritis (also known as Reiter's syndrome) can cause a wide range of symptoms. The most common symptoms include:

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Arthritis

Arthritis is a joint disorder featuring inflammation. A joint is an area of the body where two bones meet. A joint functions to allow movement of the body parts it connects. Arthritis literally means inflammation of one or more joints. Arthritis is frequently accompanied by joint pain. Joint pain is referred to as arthralgia.

Arthritis

Rheumatism: A general term for acute and chronic conditions characterized by inflammation, soreness and stiffness of muscles, and pain in joints and associated structures. It includes arthritis (infectious, rheumatoid, gouty), arthritis due to rheumatic fever or trauma/ degenerative joint disease: neurogenic arthropathy, hydroarthrosis, myositis, bursitis, fibromyositis, and many other conditions. Arthritis: Inflammation of a joint, usually accompanied by pain, swelling and frequently, changes in structure. Other forms of arthritis include ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

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ARTHRITIC PAIN RELIEF RUB

Helps relieve muscle and joint pain caused by arthritis, sprains, and strains. Also used for nerve pain (neuralgia) that may be caused by shingles or diabetic neuropathy.

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CRP

To identify the presence of inflammation and to monitor response to treatment [Note: to test for your risk of heart disease, a more sensitive test (hs-CRP) is used.]

Read more on www.labtestsonline.org

Reactive arthritis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reactive arthritis (Reiter's Syndrome or Reiter's arthritis), is classified as an autoimmune condition that develops in response to an infection in another ...

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Reactive Arthritis Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms and Treatment on ...

Mar 12, 2011 ... Reactive arthritis is a chronic form of arthritis featuring the following three conditions: (1) inflamed joints, (2) inflammation of the ...

Read more on www.medicinenet.com

Reactive Arthritis: eMedicine Rheumatology

Jan 5, 2010 ... Overview: Reactive arthritis (ReA), also known as Reiter syndrome, is an autoimmune condition that develops in response to an infection.

Read more on emedicine.medscape.com

Contents

Causes
The cause of reactive arthritis (Reiter's syndrome) is not known. A generally accepted theory is that it is linked to an underlying problem with the immune system.

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Diagnosis
There is no specific test for reactive arthritis (Reiter's syndrome). However, blood tests and X-rays may be used to rule out other causes of arthritis, and blood tests can confirm whether you have the HLA-B27 gene.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Exams and Tests
The diagnosis is based on symptoms. Since the symptoms may occur at different times, the diagnosis may be delayed. A physical examination may reveal conjunctivitis or typical skin lesions.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Medical advice
Call for an appointment with your health care provider if symptoms of this condition develop.

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Outlook (Prognosis)
Reactive arthritis may go away in a few weeks, but can last for a few months. Symptoms may return over a period of several years in up to half of the people affected. The condition may become chronic.

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Possible Complications
Aortic insufficiency (rare) Arrhythmias (rare) Uveitis

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Preparing for your appointment
While you may initially consult your family physician, he or she may refer you to a rheumatologist a doctor who specializes in arthritis for further evaluation.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Prevention
The most effective way to prevent reactive arthritis (Reiter's syndrome) is to avoid the two most common infectious causes of the condition: sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and gastrointestinal infections.

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Risk factors
Certain factors increase your risk of reactive arthritis: Sex. Reactive arthritis occurs most frequently in men 20 to 40 years old. Though women also can acquire reactive arthritis, they usually have milder signs and symptoms. Women and men are equally likely to develop reactive arthritis in reaction to food-borne infections. However, men are more likely than are women to develop reactive arthritis in response to sexually transmitted bacteria.; Hereditary factors. Reactive arthritis may have a genetic component because many people with the condition also have a certain molecule on the surfaces of their cells that can be inherited. Having this genetic marker called the human leukocyte antigen...

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Symptoms
The signs and symptoms of reactive arthritis generally start one to three weeks after exposure to a triggering infection.

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Treatments and drugs
The goal of treatment is to manage your symptoms and treat any underlying bacterial infections that may still be present.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com