sinusitis

What is Sinusitis?


The sinuses are air-filled spaces in the skull (behind the forehead, nasal bones, cheeks, and eyes) that are lined with mucus membranes. Healthy sinuses contain no bacteria or other germs. Usually, mucus is able to drain out and air is able to circulate.

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Also known as sinus infection, rhinosinusitis, Sinusitides
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Sinusitis information from trusted sources:

Sinusitis

Sinusitis means your sinuses are infected or inflamed. Your sinuses are hollow air spaces within the bones surrounding the nose. They produce mucus, which drains into the nose. If your nose is swollen, this can block the sinuses and cause pain and infection. Sinusitis can be acute, lasting for less than four weeks, or chronic, lasting much longer. Acute sinusitis often starts as a cold, which then turns into a bacterial infection. Allergies, pollutants, nasal problems and certain diseases can also cause sinusitis.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Sinusitis

Sinusitis refers to inflammation of the sinuses that occurs with a viral, bacterial, or fungal infection. See also: Chronic sinusitis

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Sinusitis

Sinusitis is inflammation (swelling) of the lining of the sinuses, caused by a viral or bacterial infection.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Sinusitis

Sinusitis is an inflammation of the paranasal sinuses. The paranasal sinuses are air-filled cavities in the facial bones that open into the nasal passage through tiny holes called ostia. Sinusitis occurs when the sinuses become inflamed and the ostia become blocked. In acute uncomplicated sinusitis, symptoms last less than one month, and may be treated by a generalist physician. Chronic sinusitis, defined as sinusitis of at least three months' duration, may require the care of an ear, nose, and throat (ENT) specialist. Most doctors believe that chronic sinusitis is a result of a series of past infections rather than a single persistent infection.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Sinus Infection

Sinus infection, or sinusitis, is an inflammation of the sinuses and nasal passages. A sinus infection can cause a headache or pressure in the eyes, nose, cheek area, or on one side of the head. A person with a sinus infection may also have a cough, a fever, bad breath, and nasal congestion with thick nasal secretions. Sinusitis is categorized as acute (sudden onset) or chronic (long term, the most common type).

Chronic sinusitis

With chronic sinusitis, the cavities around nasal passages (sinuses) become inflamed and swollen. This interferes with drainage and causes mucus to build up. This common condition is also called chronic rhinosinusitis.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Acute sinusitis

With acute sinusitis, the cavities around your nasal passages (sinuses) become inflamed and swollen. This interferes with drainage and causes mucus to build up. This common condition is also called acute rhinosinusitis.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Contents

Complications
Complications of sinusitis are more common in children than in adults. If your child has had sinusitis and has swelling around the cheekbone or eyelid, it may be facial cellulitis (bacterial infection of the skin and soft tissue) or periorbital cellulitis (infection of the tissue surrounding the eye).

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Diagnosis
Your GP will usually be able to diagnose sinusitis from your symptoms.

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Exams and Tests
The doctor will examine you or your child for sinusitis by:Looking in the nose for signs of polyps; Shining a light against the sinus (transillumination) for signs of inflammation; Tapping over a sinus area to find infection; Allergy testing; Blood tests for HIV or other tests for poor immune function; Ciliary function tests; Nasal cytology ; Sweat chloride tests for cystic fibrosis

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Medical advice
Call your doctor if:Your symptoms last longer than 10 - 14 days or you have a cold that gets worse after 7 days; You have a severe headache, unrelieved by over-the-counter pain medicine; You have a fever; You still have symptoms after taking all of your antibiotics properly

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Outlook (Prognosis)
Sinus infections are usually curable with self-care measures and medical treatment. If you are having recurrent attacks, you should be checked for underlying causes such as nasal polyps or other problems, such as allergies.

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Possible Complications
Although very rare, complications may include: Abscess ; Bone infection (osteomyelitis); Meningitis ; Skin infection around the eye (orbital cellulitis)

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Prevention
There are a number of things that you can do to decrease your risk of getting sinusitis...

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Symptoms
The most common symptoms of sinusitis include...

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Treatment
About two thirds of people who get sinusitis do not need to see their GP. Most cases are caused by a viral infection, which often clears up by itself.

Read more on www.nhs.uk