sorethroat

What is Sore Throat?


While a number of alternative treatments are commonly used to treat sore throat symptoms, evidence is limited about what works and what doesn't. Check with your doctor before using any herbal remedies, as they can interact with prescription medications and may not be safe if you're pregnant or have certain health conditions.

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Also known as laryngitis, Pharyngitis, Sore Throats, throat - sore, pain - throat, pharynx disorders, pharyngeal disorders
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Sore Throat information from trusted sources:

Sore Throat

Sore throats are usually named for the anatomical site affected. Pharyngitis: The pharynx, the area of your throat directly behind your mouth and soft palate, is a common hallway for food, liquids, and air. Swallowing safely delivers solids and liquids to the stomach through the esophagus. Pharyngitis is pain and inflammation of the pharynx. Tonsillitis: Tonsillitis typically involves inflammation of the tonsils (tonsils are located on either side of the base of the tongue). Laryngitis: The larynx, the top portion of your windpipe (trachea), has an important gatekeeper function. It allows passage of air in and out of the lungs (through the trachea), but bars the entry of solids and liquids. Sound production at the vocal cords is an important side job of the larynx. Laryngitis is pain and inflammation of the larynx (often associated with a hoarse voice). Croup is a form of laryngitis in children (it tends to be associated with a seal bark cough and difficulty inhaling air). Epiglottitis: This rare type of sore throat is inflammation of the epiglottis (a tall semitubular structure at the opening to the larynx separating it from the base of the tongue).

Pharyngitis

Your throat is a tube that carries food to your esophagus and air to your windpipe and larynx. The technical name for throat is pharynx. You can have a sore throat for many reasons. Often, colds and flu cause sore throats. Other causes can include:

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Sore Throat

The dry scratchiness and painful swallowing that are the hallmarks of a sore throat can make you miserable. A sore throat known medically as pharyngitis is most often caused by a viral infection such as a cold or the flu (influenza). In many cases, a sore throat is the first sign that you're getting sick.

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Pharyngitis

Sore throats are normally caused by bacterial or viral infections. They are a common condition, with most people having at least two or three every year. They are more common among children and teenagers. This is because young people have not built up immunity against many of the viruses and bacteria that can cause sore throats.

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Sore Throat

A sore throat may be caused by anything that irritates the sensitive mucous membranes at the back of the throat. Some irritants include viral and bacterial infections, allergic reactions, dust, smoke, fumes, hot foods or drinks, tooth or gum infections, abrasions. Hoarseness is considered a side effect. Strep throat is caused by streptococcus and is characterized by inflammation and fever. In degrees of soreness, this one beats them all, with the exception of diphtheria possibly.

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Laryngitis

Your throat is a tube that carries food to your esophagus and air to your windpipe and larynx. The technical name for throat is pharynx. Throat problems are common. You've probably had a sore throat The cause is usually a viral infection, but other causes include allergies, infection with strep bacteria or the upward movement of stomach acids into the esophagus, called gastric reflux.

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Laryngitis

Laryngitis is swelling and irritation (inflammation) of the voice box (larynx) that is usually associated with hoarseness or loss of voice.

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Laryngitis

Laryngitis is an inflammation of your voice box (larynx) due to overuse, irritation or infection. Inside the larynx are your vocal cords two folds of mucous membrane covering muscle and cartilage.

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Laryngitis

The larynx, or voice box, joins the back of the throat to the windpipe. The vocal cords that vibrate to produce sound are in the larynx. Laryngitis is inflammation of the larynx and is a common condition of the throat.

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Laryngitis

Laryngitis is inflammation of the vocal cords that results in a hoarse, raspy voice. The vocal cords produce sound by vibrating. When they swell, the nature of the sound they produce changes. Mild inflammation usually results in mild hoarseness. As the inflammation worsens, the voice may be reduced to a harsh whisper.

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Contents

Causes
Breathing through the mouth (can cause drying and irritation of the throat); Common cold; Endotracheal intubation (tube insertion); Flu; Infectious mononucleosis; Something stuck in the throat (See: Choking child or adult and CPR); Strep throat; Surgery such as tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy; Viral pharyngitis

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Complications
Most conditions that cause sore throats aren't serious and go away on their own without causing any complications. However, some bacterial and viral infections can lead to other, more serious problems.

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Considerations
Sore throats are common. Most of the time the soreness is worse in the morning and improves as the day progresses.

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Diagnosis
If you have a sore throat, a clinical diagnosis of the condition is usually not required, unless your symptoms do not improve after two weeks.

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Home Care
Most sore throats are soon over. In the meantime, the following remedies may help:Drink warm liquids. Honey or lemon tea is a time-tested remedy.; Gargle several times a day with warm salt water (1/2 tsp of salt in 1 cup water).; Cold liquids or popsicles help some sore throats.; Sucking on hard candies or throat lozenges can be very soothing, because it increases saliva production. This is often as effective as more expensive remedies, but should not be used in young children because of the choking risk.; Use a cool-mist vaporizer or humidifier to moisten and soothe a dry and painful throat.; Try over-the-counter pain medications, such as acetaminophen. Do NOT give aspirin to children.

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Lifestyle and home remedies
Until your sore throat has run its course, try these tips: Increase your fluid intake. Fluids such as water, juice, tea and warm soup help replace fluids lost during mucus production or fever. Avoid alcohol and caffeine, which can cause dehydration. Gargle with warm salt water. Mix 1/2 teaspoon of salt in a full glass of warm water, gargle, and then spit the water out. This will soothe your throat and clear it of mucus. Use honey and lemon. Stir honey and lemon to taste into a glass of very hot water, allowing it to cool to room temperature before you or your children sip it. The honey coats and soothes your throat, and the lemon helps cut mucus. This time-tested recipe may relieve most...

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Medical advice
Call your health care provider if there is:Excessive drooling in a young child; Fever, especially 101°F or greater; Pus in the back of the throat; Red rash that feels rough, and increased redness in the skin folds; Severe difficulty swallowing or breathing; Tender or swollen lymph glands in the neck

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Preparing for your appointment
Your doctor will want to know what symptoms you've been having and how long you've had them. He or she will ask you a number of questions and do a physical examination to try to determine the cause of your sore throat.

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Prevention
Clean your hands frequently, especially before eating. This is a powerful way to help prevent many sore throat infections. You might avoid some sore throats by reducing contact with people with sore throats, but often these people are contagious even before they have symptoms, so this approach is less effective.

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Risk factors
Although anyone can get a sore throat, some factors make you more susceptible to throat problems. These factors include: Age. Children and teens are most likely to develop sore throats. Children are also more likely to have strep throat, the most common bacterial infection associated with a sore throat. Smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke. Tobacco smoke, whether primary or secondary, contains hundreds of toxic chemicals that can irritate the throat lining. Allergies. If you have seasonal allergies or ongoing allergic reactions to dust, molds or pet dander, you're more likely to develop a sore throat than are people who don't have allergies. Exposure to chemical irritants. Particulate...

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Symptoms
Sore throat symptoms include: A dry, scratchy or swollen throat Pain when swallowing, breathing or talking

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Treatment
Sore throats are not usually serious and the condition will often pass within 3-7 days.

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What to Expect at Your Office Visit
Sore throats are common. Most of the time the soreness is worse in the morning and improves as the day progresses.

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