soyallergy

What is soy allergy?


All food allergies are caused by an immune system malfunction. Your immune system identifies certain soy proteins as harmful, triggering the production of immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies to neutralize the soy protein (allergen). The next time you come in contact with soy, these IgE antibodies recognize it and signal your immune system to release histamine and other chemicals into your bloodstream.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Also known as allergy, soy
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soy allergy information from trusted sources:

Soy allergy

Soy, a product of soybeans, is one of the common foods that can cause allergies in children. In many cases soy allergy starts with a reaction to a soy-based infant formula. Although most children outgrow soy allergy by age 3, soy allergy may persist and is becoming more common in adults.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Soy

The soybean has been a part of the human diet for almost 5,000 years. Unlike most plant foods, the soybean is high in protein and is considered equivalent to animal foods in terms of the quality of the protein it contains.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Natto

Natto is a common food in Japan. It is helpful for heart disease. It may also be used to prevent osteoporosis ("brittle bones") and can be used with other cancer treatments.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Allergies

Allergy is the term used to describe an adverse (bad) reaction that the body has to a particular substance. Most things that cause allergies are not harmful, and have no affect on people who are not allergic.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Allergic Reaction

An allergic reaction is the body's way of responding to an "invader." When the body senses a foreign substance, called an antigen, the immune system is triggered. The immune system normally protects the body from harmful agents such as bacteria and toxins. Its overreaction to a harmless substance (an allergen) is called a hypersensitivity reaction, or an allergic, reaction. Anything can be an allergen. Common dust, pollen, plants, medications, certain foods, insect venoms, animal dander, viruses, or bacteria are examples of allergens. Reactions may occur in one spot, such as a small skin rash or itchy eyes, or all over, as in a whole body rash. A reaction may include one or several symptoms. In rare cases, an allergic reaction can be life-threatening (known as anaphylaxis). Each year in the United States, over 400 people die from anaphylactic reactions to penicillin, and nearly 100 Americans die from anaphylactic reactions to insects, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA).

Soy allergy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Soy allergy is a type of food allergy. It is a hypersensitivity to dietary substances from soy causing an overreaction of the immune system which may lead ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Soy Allergy

Allergy to soy is a major allergy and one of the more common food allergies. Soy, which is called Soya outside the USA, is used in most manufactured ...

Read more on www.allergicchild.com

Soy Allergy

Although soy allergy occurs most often in infants and children, it can appear at any age and can be caused by foods that had been previously eaten without ...

Read more on my.clevelandclinic.org

Soy Allergy - Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America ...

Food Allergies Soy (also called soya, soy bean, or glycine max), is among the most common foods that cause allergic reactions. Researchers are still not ...

Read more on www.aafa.org

Living With a Soy Allergy

Feb 5, 2009 ... Soy allergies are most common in infants. Learn more about soy allergies.

Read more on www.webmd.com

Contents

Preparing for your appointment
Call 911 or go to an emergency room if you or your child develops symptoms of anaphylaxis, such as difficulty breathing or a rapid, weak pulse.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Prevention
There is no sure way to prevent a food allergy from occurring. But if you have an infant, breast-feeding instead of using a soy-based or milk-based formula may help. Experts recommend breast-feeding for at least the first four to six months to reduce the risk of food allergies and for other health benefits.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Risk factors
Certain factors may put you at greater risk of developing a soy allergy: Family history. You're at increased risk of allergy to soy or other foods if allergies, such as hay fever, asthma, hives or eczema, are common in your family.; Age. Soy allergy is most common in children, especially toddlers and infants. As you grow older, your digestive system matures and your body is less likely to absorb food or food components that trigger allergies.; Other allergies. In some cases, people who are allergic to wheat, beans (legumes), milk or other foods can have an allergic reaction to soy.

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Symptoms
For most people, soy allergy is uncomfortable but not serious. Rarely, an allergic reaction to soy can be frightening and even life-threatening. Signs and symptoms of a food allergy usually develop within a few minutes to an hour after eating soy-containing food.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Tests and diagnosis
Your doctor will ask about your symptoms and may perform a physical exam to find or rule out other medical problems. He or she may also recommend one or both of the following tests: Skin test. In this test, your skin is pricked and exposed to small amounts of the proteins found in soy. If you're allergic, you develop a raised bump (hive) at the test location on your skin. Allergy specialists usually are best equipped to perform and interpret allergy skin tests.; Blood test. A blood test can measure your immune system's response to soy by measuring the amount of certain antibodies in your bloodstream, known as immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies. A blood sample is sent to a medical laboratory,...

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Treatments and drugs
The only way to prevent an allergic reaction is to avoid soy and soy proteins altogether.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com