stableangina

What is stable angina?


Your health care provider will perform a physical exam and measure your blood pressure. The following tests may be done to diagnose or rule out angina: Coronary angiography ; Coronary risk profile ; ECG ; Exercise tolerance test (stress test or treadmill test); Stress echocardiogram

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Stable angina

Stable angina is chest pain or discomfort that typically occurs with activity or stress. The pain usually begins slowly and gets worse over the next few minutes before going away. It quickly goes away with medication or rest, but may happen again with additional activity or stress. See also: Unstable angina

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Angina Pectoris

If you are having pain or pressure in the middle of your chest, left neck, left shoulder, or left arm, go immediately to the nearest hospital emergency department. Do not drive yourself. Call 911 for emergency transport. Angina, or angina pectoris, is the medical term used to describe the temporary chest discomfort that occurs when the heart is not getting enough blood.

Angina

Treatment for stable angina has three goals...

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Angina

Angina is a type of chest pain or discomfort caused by reduced blood flow to the heart muscle. Angina (an-JI-nuh or AN-juh-nuh) is a symptom of coronary artery disease. When you have coronary artery disease, your heart muscle doesn't get enough oxygen-rich blood. This lack of blood flow may cause chest pain. Angina is typically described as squeezing, pressure, heaviness, tightness or pain in your chest. Many people with angina say it feels like someone is standing on their chest.

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Angina

Your heart is always working to pump blood to your entire body. Blood carries oxygen and other things that your body needs in order to do its work. Your heart needs a constant supply of oxygen-rich blood for itself as well. The blood vessels that supply blood to your heart muscle are called coronary (KOHR-oh-nar-ee) arteries. Sometimes one or more of the coronary arteries become narrowed or blocked. This may cause you to feel pain or discomfort in your chest at certain times. This chest pain that comes and goes is called angina (AN-ji-nah).

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Koate-Dvi

Antihemophilic Factor (Human), Koà te-DVI, is a sterile, stable, purified, dried concentrate of human Antihemophilic Factor (AHF, factor VIII, AHG) which has been treated with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TNBP) and polysorbate 80 and heated in lyophilized form in the final container at 80°C for 72 hours. Koà te-DVI is intended for use in therapy of classical hemophilia (hemophilia A).

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DIVALPROEX SODIUM DELAYED-RELEASE

Divalproex sodium is a stable co-ordination compound comprised of sodium valproate and valproic acid in a 1:1 molar relationship and formed during the partial neutralization of valproic acid with 0.5 equivalent of sodium hydroxide. Chemically it is designated as sodium hydrogen bis(2-propylpentanoate). Divalproex sodium has the following structure:Divalproex sodium occurs as a white powder with a characteristic odor. Mania Divalproex sodium delayed-release tablets are indicated for the treatment of the manic episodes associated with bipolar disorder. A manic episode is a distinct period of abnormally and persistently elevated, expansive, or irritable mood. Typical symptoms of mania include pressure of speech, motor hyperactivity, reduced need for sleep, flight of ideas, grandiosity, poor judgement, aggressiveness, and possible hostility.

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Angina pectoris - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In stable angina, the developing atheroma is protected with a fibrous cap. This cap (atherosclerotic plaque) may rupture in unstable angina, allowing blood ...

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Angina, chest pain in women

Stable angina is the most common type of angina. It occurs if the heart is working harder than usual. Stable angina has a regular pattern. ...

Read more on www.nhlbi.nih.gov

Angina Pectoris: eMedicine Cardiology

Jan 8, 2010 ... For most patients with stable angina, physical examination findings are normal. .... Low-dose aspirin therapy for chronic stable angina. ...

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Contents

Causes
Your heart muscle is working all the time, so it needs a continuous supply of oxygen. This oxygen is provided by the coronary arteries, which carry blood.

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Medical advice
Seek medical attention if you have new, unexplained chest pain or pressure. If you have had angina before, call your doctor.

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Outlook (Prognosis)
Stable angina usually improves with medication.

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Possible Complications
Heart attack Sudden death caused by abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias) Unstable angina

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Prevention
Your doctor may tell you to take nitroglycerin a few minutes in advance if you plan to perform an activity that may trigger angina pain.

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Symptoms
The most common symptom is chest pain that occurs behind the breastbone or slightly to the left of it. It may feel like tightness, heavy pressure, squeezing, or crushing pain. The pain may spread to the:Arm (usually the left); Back; Jaw; Neck; Shoulder; Occurs after activity, stress, or exertion; Lasts an average of 1 - 15 minutes; Is relieved with rest or a medicine called nitroglycerin; A feeling of indigestion or heartburn; Dizziness or light-headedness; Nausea, vomiting, and cold sweats;...

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Treatment
The options for treating angina include lifestyle changes, medications, and invasive procedures such as coronary angioplasty or stent placement and coronary artery bypass surgery. You and your doctor should agree on a plan for treating your angina on a daily basis. This should include: What medicines you should be taking to prevent angina, What activities are okay for you to do, and which ones are not, What medicines you should take when you have angina, What are the signs that your angina is...

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