stroke

What is Stroke?


A stroke occurs when there's a problem with the amount of blood in your brain. The cause of the main type of stroke ischemic stroke is too little blood in the brain. The cause of the other type of stroke hemorrhagic stroke is too much blood within the skull.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Also known as Strokes, cva, Apoplexy, cerebrovascular disease, Acute Stroke, brain attack, cerebral hemorrhage
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Stroke information from trusted sources:

National Stroke Association: Information on Stroke Prevention ...

Nov 11, 2010 ... Information on Stroke, Stroke Prevention, Stroke Recovery and Stroke Care.

Read more on www.stroke.org

Stroke Trials Registry

Mar 12, 2010 ... The Stroke Trials Registry is a continuously updated registry of randomized clinical trials in stroke and cerebrovascular disease.

Read more on www.strokecenter.org

Stroke

A stroke is when a clogged or burst artery interrupts blood flow to the brain. This interruption of blood flow deprives the brain of needed oxygen and ...

Read more on www.asha.org

Stroke Basics - Stroke Center - EverydayHealth.com

Learn about the different types of strokes, why strokes occur, and how to recognize stroke warning signs, at EverydayHealth.com.

Read more on www.everydayhealth.com

Understanding Risk - American Stroke Association

Power To End Stroke puts the power is in your hands to prevent and overcome stroke, and the American Stroke Association will provide the information and ...

Stroke

Stroke is a brain attack. It is much like a heart attack, only it occurs in the brain. Like a heart attack, stroke is a medical emergency. Do not wait or hesitate to call for emergency medical help. Fast treatment makes a big difference in outcome for someone having a stroke. CALL 911 for STROKE

Stroke

Jan 28, 2009 ... attack or stroke) is higher in patch users. Talk with your doctor if you have ques- ... effects of a stroke. Its goals are to build ...

Read more on www.womenshealth.gov

Stroke - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A stroke, previously known medically as a cerebrovascular accident (CVA), is the rapidly developing loss of brain function(s) due to disturbance in the ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Stroke definition - Heart Disease and Other Cardiovascular ...

Nov 29, 2010 ... Stroke: The sudden death of some brain cells due to a lack of oxygen when the blood flow to the brain is impaired by blockage or rupture of ...

Read more on www.medterms.com

Cerebrovascular disease

A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted. Symptoms of stroke are

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Contents

Complications
Depending on how long the brain suffers a lack of blood flow, a stroke can sometimes cause temporary or permanent disabilities. Stroke complications differ depending what part of the brain was affected and may include: Paralysis or loss of muscle movement. Sometimes, a lack of blood flow to the brain can cause a person to become paralyzed on one side of the body, or lose control of certain muscles, such as those on one side of the face. With physical therapy, you may see improvement in muscle movement or paralysis.Difficulty talking or swallowing. A stroke may cause a person to have less control over the way the muscles in the mouth move, making it difficult to talk, swallow or eat. A person...

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Coping and support
Recovering from a stroke can be mentally exhausting. In addition to the various physical side effects, feelings of helplessness, frustration, depression and apathy aren't unusual. Diminished sex drive and mood changes also are common.

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Diagnosis
Strokes are usually diagnosed by studying images of the brain (brain imaging). This can also be helpful in determining the risk of a transient ischaemic attack (TIA).

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Exams and Tests
A complete physical and neurological exam should be performed. Your doctor will:Check for problems with vision, movement, sensation, reflexes, understanding, and speaking. Your doctor and nurses will repeat this exam over time to see if your stroke is getting worse or is improving.; Listen for an abnormal sound, called a "bruit," when using a stethoscope to listen to the carotid arteries in the neck. A bruit is caused by turbulent blood flow.; Check and assess your blood pressure, which may be high.; A CT scan of the brain is often done soon after symptoms of a stroke begin. An MRI scan of the brain may be done instead or afterwards.; Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) or CT angiography may be done to check for abnormal blood vessels in the brain that may have caused the stroke.; Echocardiogram may be done if the stroke could have been caused by a blood clot from the heart.; Carotid duplex (a type of ultrasound exam) can show if narrowing of the neck arteries (carotid stenosis) led to the stroke.; An angiogram of the head can reveal which blood vessel is blocked or bleeding, and help your doctor decide if the artery can be reopened using a thin tube.; Laboratory tests will include acomplete blood count (CBC), bleeding time, and blood clotting tests (prothrombin time or partial thromboplastin time).; Electrocardiogram (ECG) and heart rhythm monitoring can help determine if an irregular heart beat (such as atrial fibrillation) caused the stroke.; A spinal tap (cerebrospinal fluid exam) may also be done.

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Medical advice
Stroke is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment. Call your local emergency number (such as 911) if someone has symptoms of a stroke.

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Outlook (Prognosis)
The outlook depends on the type of stroke, how much brain tissue is damaged, what body functions have been affected, and how quickly treatment is received. Recovery may occur completely, or there may be some permanent loss of function.

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Possible Complications
Breathing in a food into the airway (aspiration); Decreased life span; Difficulty communicating; Permanent loss of brain functions; Permanent loss of movement or sensation in one or more parts of the body; Problems due to loss of mobility, including joint contractures and pressure sores; Fractures; Malnutrition; Muscle spasticity; Reduced ability to function or care for self; Reduced social interactions; Side effects of medications

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Preparing for your appointment
A stroke is usually diagnosed in an emergency situation, but if you're concerned about your risk of having a stroke, you can prepare to discuss the subject with your doctor at your next appointment.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Prevention
The best way to prevent a stroke is to eat a healthy diet, exercise regularly, and avoid smoking and excessive consumption of alcohol.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Risk factors
Many factors can increase your risk of a stroke. A number of these factors can also increase your chances of having a heart attack. Stroke risk factors include: A family history of stroke, heart attack or TIA; Being age 55 or older; High blood pressure a systolic blood pressure of 140 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) or higher, or a diastolic pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher; High cholesterol a total cholesterol level of 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 5.2 mmol/L, or higher; Cigarette smoking; Diabetes; Obesity a body mass index of 30 or higher; Cardiovascular disease, including heart failure, a heart defect, heart infection, or abnormal heart rhythm; Previous stroke or TIA; High levels...

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Risks
The damage caused by a stroke can be widespread and long-lasting. Many people need to have a long period of rehabilitation before they can recover their former independence.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Support Groups
Additional support and resources are available from the American Stroke Association -- www.strokeassociation.org.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Symptoms
Watch for these stroke symptoms if you think you or someone else is having a stroke: Trouble with walking. If you're having a stroke, you may stumble or have sudden dizziness, loss of balance or loss of coordination. Trouble with speaking. If you're having a stroke, you may slur your speech or may not be able to come up with words to explain what is happening (aphasia). Try to repeat a simple sentence. If you can't, you may be having a stroke. Paralysis or numbness on one side of the body. If you're having a stroke, you may have sudden numbness, weakness or paralysis on one side of the body. Try to raise both your arms over your head at the same time. If one arm begins to fall, you may be...

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Treatment
Ischaemic strokes can be treated using a 'clot-busting' medicine called alteplase, which dissolves blood clots. However, alteplase is only effective if used during the first three hours after a stroke has taken place. After that time, the medicine has no beneficial effects.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Who's at risk
Ischaemic strokes occur when blood clots block the flow of blood to the brain. Blood clots typically form in areas where the arteries have been narrowed or blocked by fatty cholesterol-containing deposits known as plaques. This narrowing of the arteries is known as atherosclerosis.

Read more on www.nhs.uk