strokerehabilitation

What is stroke rehabilitation?


A stroke is an interruption of the blood supply to any part of the brain. Stroke is the leading cause of disability among adults in the United States. It is the country's third leading cause of death. This article discusses recovery from stroke. How well a person does after a stroke depends on the severity of the stroke and how quickly treatment is received. For addition information, see: Stroke Stroke risk factors and prevention Carotid artery disease Transient ischemic attack

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stroke rehabilitation information from trusted sources:

Stroke

A stroke occurs when the blood supply to a part of your brain is interrupted or severely reduced, depriving brain tissue of oxygen and nutrients. Within a few minutes, brain cells begin to die.

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Stroke

Even if the symptoms of a stroke disappear while you are waiting for the ambulance to arrive, you (or they) should still go to hospital for an assessment because there is a risk that you may be about to have a full stroke.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Stroke

Stroke is a brain attack. It is much like a heart attack, only it occurs in the brain. Like a heart attack, stroke is a medical emergency. Do not wait or hesitate to call for emergency medical help. Fast treatment makes a big difference in outcome for someone having a stroke. CALL 911 for STROKE

Stroke

Sudden loss of consciousness followed by paralysis caused by hemorrhage into the brain, formation of an embolus or thrombus, that occludes an artery, or rupture of an extracerebral artery causing subarachnoid hemorrhage.

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Stroke Rehabilitation -- familydoctor.org

Stroke rehabilitation is a very important part of recovery for many people who have had a stroke. Learn how it can help you or your loved one who has had a ...

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Stroke Rehabilitation-Overview

Jun 30, 2009 ... Is this topic for you?This topic covers rehabilitation after a stroke. For information on stroke itself, see the topic Stroke.

Read more on www.webmd.com

Physical Activity and Exercise Recommendations for Stroke ...

by NF Gordon - 2004 - Cited by 181 - Related articles

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Stroke recovery - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Stroke rehabilitation typically involves inpatient rehab first, and then community-based (outpatient) rehab once the patient has left the inpatient setting. ...

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Post-Stroke Rehabilitation

Nov 2, 2010 ... The effects of stroke may mean that you must change, relearn or redefine how you live. Stroke rehabilitation helps you return to independent ...

Stroke/Transient Ischemic Attacks

A stroke is a "brain attack," a sudden interruption of bloodflow to the brain that causes brain damage and loss of function. Stroke is a leading cause of disability and death. Stroke develops suddenly, usually in a matter of minutes, and causes symptoms such as paralysis, numbness or weakness that often affects just one side of the body, confusion, dizziness, speech problems, and loss of vision. The blood supply interruption kills brain cells by depriving them of oxygen and other nutrients found in the blood. Brain cells also become damaged if bleeding occurs in or around the brain, which happens in certain types of strokes. As brain cells die, function is lost in the areas of the brain that they control, such as memory, speech, or movement. The specific functions that will be affected depend on which areas of the brain were damaged and the severity of the stroke.

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Contents

Rehabilitation
After a serious injury, illness or surgery, you may recover slowly. You may need to regain your strength, relearn skills or find new ways of doing things you did before. This process is rehabilitation. Rehabilitation often focuses on

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Stroke
A stroke is an interruption of the blood supply to any part of the brain. A stroke is sometimes called a "brain attack." See also: Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) Hemorrhagic stroke Stroke secondary to carotid dissection Stroke secondary to cocaine use

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Cerebrovascular disease
A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. "Mini-strokes" or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted. Symptoms of stroke are

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Apoplexy
Apoplexy is bleeding into an organ or loss of blood flow to an organ. For example, adrenal apoplexy is bleeding into the adrenal glands, pituitary apoplexy is bleeding into the pituitary gland, and so on. When the word apoplexy (with no organ specified) is used alone, it often refers to stroke symptoms that occur suddenly. Such symptoms can be caused by bleeding into the brain or by a blood clot in a brain blood vessel. Conditions such as subarachnoid hemorrhage or stroke are sometimes called apoplexy. Functional apoplexy is when a person appears to be having stroke-like symptoms but there is no brain abnormality.

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Cerebrovascular Accident
Sudden loss of consciousness followed by paralysis caused by hemorrhage into the brain, formation of an embolus or thrombus, that occludes an artery, or rupture of an extracerebral artery causing subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com
CVA
Sudden loss of consciousness followed by paralysis caused by hemorrhage into the brain, formation of an embolus or thrombus, that occludes an artery, or rupture of an extracerebral artery causing subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com
Stroke-Related Dementia
Stroke (“brain attack”) is a disease of the blood vessels in and around the brain. It occurs when part of the brain does not receive enough blood to function normally and the cells die (infarction), or when a blood vessel ruptures (hemorrhagic stroke). Infarction is more common than hemorrhage and has a number of causes, for example, a vessel (artery) supplying blood to the brain can become blocked by a fatty deposit (plaque), which can form clots and send pieces into vessels further in the brain, or these arteries become thickened or hardened, narrowing the space where the blood flows (atherosclerosis). In addition, clots can arise in the heart and travel to the brain. Permanent damage to brain cells can result. The symptoms of stroke vary, depending on which part of the brain is affected.

Stroke risk factors and prevention
A stroke is an interruption of the blood supply to any part of the brain. A stroke is sometimes called a "brain attack." There are two major types of stroke: ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke. When a blood vessel that supplies blood to the brain is blocked by a blood clot, this is called an ischemic stroke. A blocked artery may happen in two ways. A clot may form in an artery that is already very narrow. This is called a thrombus. If it completely blocks the artery, it is called a thrombolic stroke. A clot may break off from somewhere in your body and travel up to the brain to block a smaller artery. This is called an embolism. It causes an embolic stroke. A second major cause of stroke is bleeding in the brain. This is called a hemorrhagic stroke. It can occur when small blood vessels in the brain become weak and burst. Some people have defects in the blood vessels of the brain that make this more likely. The flow of blood that occurs after the blood vessel ruptures damages brain cells. See also: Stroke Stroke recovery

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Post-Stroke Rehabilitation Fact Sheet: National Institute of ...
May 21, 2010 ... Post-stroke rehabilitation fact sheet from NINDS, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Read more on www.ninds.nih.gov
Stroke Rehabilitation - American Heart Association
Does a person need rehabilitation to recover from a stroke? Most gains in a person's ability to function in the first 30 days after a stroke are due to ...

Read more on www.americanheart.org
Stroke Rehabilitation Information: National Institute of ...
Jun 22, 2007 ... The goal of rehabilitation is to enable an individual who has experienced a stroke to reach the highest possible level of independence and ...

Read more on www.ninds.nih.gov