syphilis

What is Syphilis?


Syphilis is caused by a bacterial organism called treponema pallidum. The bacteria can then enter your body through close contact with an infected sore, normally during vaginal, anal or oral sex, or by sharing sex toys.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Also known as rpr, lues, vdrl, syph, tppa, venereal disease research laboratory, darkfield microscopy
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Syphilis information from trusted sources:

Syphilis

Syphilis (pronounced SIF-uh-lus) is a sexually transmitted disease caused by bacteria. The highly infectious disease may also be passed, but much less often, through blood transfusions or from mother to fetus in the womb. Without treatment, syphilis can cause irreversible damage to the brain, nerves, and body tissues. The symptoms of syphilis can mimic many diseases. Sir William Osler stated, "The physician who knows syphilis knows medicine."

Fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption test

To screen for or diagnose an infection with the bacterium Treponema pallidum, which causes the sexually transmitted disease (STD) syphilis

Read more on www.labtestsonline.org

Syphilis

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by bacteria. It infects the genital area, lips, mouth, or anus of both men and women. You usually get syphilis from sexual contact with someone who has it. It can also pass from mother to baby during pregnancy. The early stage of syphilis usually causes a single, small, painless sore. Sometimes it causes swelling in nearby lymph nodes. If you do not treat it, syphilis usually causes a non-itchy skin rash, often on your hands and feet. Many people do not notice symptoms for years. Symptoms can go away and come back.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Syphilis

Syphilis is infection with the bacteria Treponema pallidum.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Syphilis

Syphilis is a bacterial infection usually spread by sexual contact. The disease starts as a painless sore on your genitals, mouth or another part of your body. If untreated, syphilis can damage your heart and brain.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Syphilis

Syphilis is a bacterial infection that is typically passed through sexual contact. However, it can be passed on by intravenous drug use (injecting drugs directly into the vein), blood transfusions and from an infected mother to her unborn child. The latter is known as congenital syphilis.

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Syphilis

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease characterized by contagious, open sores on the genitals, in the anal region, or in the mouth. Syphilis develops in three characteristic stages. It starts with a usually painless, open sore at the point of contact. Months later, a rash appears, which may be accompanied by fever, enlarged lymph nodes, sore throat, weight loss, malaise, loss of appetite, headache, stiff neck, and achy joints and bones. Syphilis then becomes latent, or hidden, for years.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Contents

Diagnosis
If you suspect you have syphilis, you should visit your GP, or GUM (genito-urinary or sexual health) clinic as soon as possible. The earlier syphilis is treated, the less chance there is of serious complications.

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Exams and Tests
Blood tests can be done to detect substances produced by the bacteria that cause syphilis. The older test is the VDRL test. Other blood tests may include RPR and FTA-ABS.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Medical advice
Notify your health care provider if you develop signs or symptoms of syphilis. Several conditions may have similar symptoms, so you will need to have a complete medical exam.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Outlook (Prognosis)
With prompt treatment and follow-up care, syphilis can be cured.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Possible Complications
Complications of untreated syphilis include:Damage to the skin and bones; Heart and blood vessel problems, including inflammation and aneurysms of the aorta; Neurosyphilis

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Prevention
The only guaranteed way to prevent catching syphilis is to avoid sex. Limiting the number of your sexual partners will also help.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Risk factors
You face an increased risk of acquiring syphilis if you: Engage in high-risk sexual activity, including unprotected sex, sex with multiple partners, having sex with a new partner, or having sex under the influence of drugs or alcohol; Are a man who has sex with men; Are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Symptoms
Syphilis develops in four stages, and symptoms vary with each stage. But the stages may overlap, and symptoms don't always occur in the same order. You may be infected with syphilis and not notice any symptoms for years. If you have HIV infection at the same time, the symptoms of syphilis may be somewhat different than without HIV infection.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Treatment
Primary and secondary syphilis can be successfully treated using a 10-14 day course of antibiotics. Penicillin is normally used, though other antibiotics can be used if you are allergic to penicillin.

Read more on www.nhs.uk