systemiclupuserythematosus

What is systemic lupus erythematosus?


If your symptoms of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are mild or well-controlled, you may find that the condition barely affects your day-to-day life, and you may not experience any complications.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Also known as sle, discoid lupus, lupus erythematosus, systemic, subacute cutaneous lupus, disseminated lupus erythematosus, Libman Sacks Disease, erythematosus, systemic lupus, Libman-Sacks Disease, Lupus Erythematosus Disseminatus
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systemic lupus erythematosus information from trusted sources:

Lupus

If you have lupus, your immune system attacks healthy cells and tissues by mistake. This can damage your joints, skin, blood vessels and organs. There are many kinds of lupus. The most common type, systemic lupus erythematosus, affects many parts of the body. Discoid lupus causes a rash that doesn't go away. Subacute cutaneous lupus causes sores after being out in the sun. Another type can be caused by medication. Neonatal lupus, which is rare, affects newborns. Anyone can get lupus, but women are most at risk. Lupus is also more common in African American, Hispanic, Asian and Native American women. The cause of lupus is not known.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Lupus

Lupus is a chronic condition that causes inflammation in the body's tissues. It is an autoimmune condition, which means that it is caused by a fault in the immune system. In people with Lupus, the immune system attacks the body's healthy cells and tissue instead of protecting the body from illness and infection.

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Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), also called lupus, is a chronic inflammatory disease that can affect almost any part of the body, especially the skin, joints, kidneys, heart, lungs, bones, blood, or brain. Systemic lupus erythematosus is considered an autoimmune disorder, meaning that a person's own immune system attacks his or her own healthy cells and tissues, causing inflammation and damage.

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Lupus

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), or lupus, is an autoimmune disease in which a person's immune system attacks various organs or cells of the body, causing damage and dysfunction. Lupus is called a multisystem disease because it can affect many different tissues and organs in the body. Some patients with lupus have very mild disease, which can be treated with simple medications, whereas others can have serious, life-threatening complications. Lupus is more common in women than men, and for reasons that are not precisely understood, its peak incidence is after puberty.

Lupus

Lupus is a chronic inflammatory disease that occurs when your body's immune system attacks your own tissues and organs. Inflammation caused by lupus can affect many different body systems, including your joints, skin, kidneys, blood cells, heart and lungs.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Lupus erythematosus

Lupus is an autoimmune disorder that can affect many different parts of the body. Normally the immune system protects the body by fighting off bacteria, viruses, and other foreign invaders. However, if you have an autoimmune disease like lupus, the immune system starts attacking your own healthy tissue. This in turn, causes inflammation, which damages the tissues. Doctors do not completely understand why autoimmunity occurs, but they suspect that it involves some combination of genetics and triggering by environmental factors, such as viruses.

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Cortisone

Glucocorticoids are adrenocortical steroids, both naturally occurring and synthetic, which are readily absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. Endocrine Disorders Primary or secondary adrenocortical insufficiency (hydrocortisone or cortisone is the first choice, synthetic analogs may be used in conjunction with mineralocorticoids where applicable, in infancy mineralocorticoid supplementation is of particular importance).Congenital adrenal hyperplasiaNonsuppurative thyroiditisHypercalcemia associated with cancer Rheumatic Disorders As adjunctive therapy for short-term administration (to tide the patient over an acute episode or exacerbation) in:Psoriatic arthritisRheumatoid arthritis, including juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (selected cases may require low-dose maintenance therapy)Ankylosing spondylitisAcute and subacute bursitisAcute nonspecific tenosynovitisAcute gouty arthritisPost-traumatic osteoarthritisSynovitis of osteoarthritisEpicondylitis Collagen Diseases During an exacerbation or as maintenance therapy in selected cases of:Systemic lupus erythematosusAcute rheumatic carditisSystemic dermatomyositis (polymyositis) Dermatologic Diseases PemphigusBullous dermatitis herpetiformisSevere erythema multiforme (Stevens-Johnson syndrome)Exfoliative dermatitisMycosis fungoidesSevere psoriasisSevere seborrheic dermatitis Allergic States Control of severe or incapacitating allergic conditions intractable to adequate trials of conventional treatment:Seasonal or perennial allergic rhinitisBronchial asthmaContact dermatitisAtopic dermatitisSerum sicknessDrug hypersensitivity reactions Ophthalmic Diseases Severe acute and chronic allergic and inflammatory processes involving the eye and its adnexa, such as:Allergic conjunctivitisKeratitisAllergic corneal marginal ulcersHerpes zoster ophthalmicusIritis and iridocyclitisChorioretinitisAnterior segment inflammationDiffuse posterior uveitis and choroiditisOptic neuritisSympathetic ophthalmia Respiratory Diseases Symptomatic...

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Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) Symptoms, Treatment, Causes ...

Mar 13, 2011 ... This phenomenon, together with the female predominance of SLE, .... Systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, ...

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Systemic lupus erythematosus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Systemic lupus erythematosus often abbreviated to SLE or lupus, is a systemic autoimmune disease (or autoimmune connective tissue disease) that can affect ...

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Lupus - MayoClinic.com

by H Archives - Related articles

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Contents

Causes
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune condition. There are lots of different types of autoimmune conditions, which all affect the body in different ways.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Diagnosis
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can be a difficult condition to diagnose. This is because the symptoms of SLE are sometimes very similar to a number of other conditions, most of which are far more common than SLE.

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Exams and Tests
The diagnosis of SLE is based upon the presence of at least four out of eleven typical characteristics of the disease. The doctor will listen to your chest with a stethoscope. A sound called a heart friction rub or pleural friction rub may be heard. A neurological exam will also be performed.

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Medical advice
Call your health care provider if you develop symptoms of SLE. Also, call if you have SLE and symptoms got worse or if new symptoms develop.

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Outlook (Prognosis)
The outcome for people with SLE has improved over recent years. Many of those with SLE have mild illness. Women with SLE who become pregnant are often able to carry the pregnancy safely to term and deliver normal infants, as long as there is no severe kidney or heart disease present and the SLE is being treated appropriately.

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Possible Complications
Some people with SLE have deposits of antibodies within the cells (glomeruli) of the kidneys. This leads to a condition called lupus nephritis. Patients with this condition may eventually develop kidney failure and require dialysis or kidney transplantation.

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Support Groups
For additional information and support, see lupus resources.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Symptoms
Symptoms vary from person to person, and may come and go. The condition may affect one organ or body system at first. Others may become involved later. Almost all people with SLE have joint pain and most develop arthritis. Frequently affected joints are the fingers, hands, wrists, and knees.

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Treatment
There is no cure for SLE. Treatment is aimed at controlling symptoms. Your individual symptoms determine your treatment. Mild disease that involves a rash, headaches, fever, arthritis, pleurisy, and pericarditis requires little therapy. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) are used to treat arthritis and pleurisy. Corticosteroid creams are used to treat skin rashes. An anti-malaria drug called hydroxychloroquine) and low dose corticosteroids are sometimes used for skin and arthritis...

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