theflu

What is the flu?


Anyone at any age can have serious complications from the flu, but those at highest risk include:People over age 50; Children between 6 months and 2 years; Women more than 3 months pregnant during the flu season; Anyone living in a long-term care facility; Anyone with chronic heart, lung, or kidney conditions, diabetes, or a weakened immune system

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Also known as influenza
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the flu information from trusted sources:

Flu

Regular immunisation (vaccination) is given free of charge to the following at-risk people, to protect them from seasonal flu...

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Influenza

Flu is a respiratory infection caused by a number of viruses. The viruses pass through the air and enter your body through your nose or mouth. Between 5% and 20% of people in the U.S. get the flu each year. The flu can be serious or even deadly for elderly people, newborn babies and people with certain chronic illnesses. Symptoms of the flu come on suddenly and are worse than those of the common cold. They may include

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

Influenza

The flu is an infection caused by a virus in the upper breathing passages that may also spread to the lungs. Symptoms include fever, headache, general aches and pains, and extreme exhaustion. The flu is a contagious disease in which the influenza virus is spread through the air by the coughing and sneezing of people who are already infected. The virus is inhaled into the lungs where it attacks tissues involved in breathing. People with the flu usually feel sick rather suddenly, with symptoms that may include fever, headache, and feeling very tired. These symptoms are sometimes followed by coughing and a stuffy or runny nose.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Influenza

Influenza is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system, including your nose, throat, bronchial tubes and lungs.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Rapid flu test

To determine whether or not you have the influenza A or B, to help your doctor make rapid treatment decisions, and to help determine whether or not the flu has come to your community

Read more on www.labtestsonline.org

Influenza

The flu is a highly contagious respiratory viral infection. Spread easily by coughing, sneezing, and poor hygiene. Vaccines have been only partially effective because of new and different viral strains that are constantly changing.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com

Flu, Swine

Influenza viruses are small RNA viruses that infect many mammals, including humans, birds, and swine. Before 2009, swine influenza predominately affected swine and was not transmitted often or easily to people. Even in the isolated instances in which swine influenza infected people, it had very limited ability to spread from person to person. Most cases were directly linked to contact with swine through farming or at fairs.

Influenza A

Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccine is a sub-unit (purified surface antigen) influenza virus vaccine prepared from virus propagated in the allantoic cavity of embryonated hens eggs inoculated with a specific type of influenza virus suspension containing neomycin and polymyxin. The influenza virus strain is harvested and clarified by centrifugation and filtration prior to inactivation with betapropiolactone. The inactivated virus is concentrated and purified by zonal centrifugation. The surface antigens, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, are obtained from the influenza virus particle by further centrifugation in the presence of nonylphenol ethoxylate, a process which removes most of the internal proteins. The nonylphenol ethoxylate is removed from the surface antigen preparation. Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccine is an inactivated influenza virus vaccine indicated for active immunization of persons 4 years of age and older against influenza disease caused by pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus (1). DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Based on currently available information the vaccination regimen is as follows:...

Read more on dailymed.nlm.nih.gov

CDC - Seasonal Influenza (Flu)

Mar 11, 2011 ... CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Influenza Flu Homepage.

Read more on www.cdc.gov

Influenza - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Influenza, commonly referred to as the flu, is an infectious disease caused by RNA viruses of the family Orthomyxoviridae (the influenza viruses), ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Contents

Causes
In temperate climates, influenza A usually arrives between early winter and early spring. Influenza B can appear at any time of the year.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Exams and Tests
The evaluation of an individual with flu symptoms should include a thorough physical exam and, in cases where pneumonia is suspected, a chest x-ray.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Medical advice
Call your health care provider if someone in a high-risk category develops symptoms of the flu, or if your illness seems severe.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Possible Complications
Possible complications, especially for those at high risk, include: Pneumonia ; Encephalitis (infection of the brain); Bronchitis; Sinus infections; Ear infections

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Prevention
A yearly vaccine is recommended for children older than 6 months, adolescents, and adults.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Symptoms
The flu usually begins abruptly, with a fever between 102 and 106 °F. (An adult typically has a lower fever than a child.) The fever usually lasts for a day or two, but can last 5 days.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Treatment
If you have mild illness and are not at high risk, take these steps: Rest, Take medicines that relieve symptoms and help you rest, Drink plenty of liquids, Avoid aspirin (especially teens and children), Avoid alcohol and tobacco, Avoid antibiotics (unless necessary for another illness). If the flu is diagnosed within 48 hours of when symptoms begin, especially if you are at high risk for complications, antiviral medications may help shorten the length of symptoms by about one day. Treatment...

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov