tracheostomy

What is tracheostomy?


A number of complications can occur following a tracheostomy. Most complications develop either during or immediately after a tracheostomy, though some can occur days or weeks later.

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Also known as ventilators, assisted breathing, Tracheostomies
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Tracheostomy

Tracheostomy is a term used to describe a surgically created hole at the front of your neck going into your windpipe (trachea). The term for the surgical procedure to create a tracheostomy is "tracheotomy," but the two terms are often used interchangeably.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com

Ventilators

People with life-threatening injuries and illnesses need critical care. Critical care involves close, constant attention by a team of specially-trained health professionals. It usually takes place in an intensive care unit (ICU) or trauma center. Problems that might need critical care treatment include complications from surgery, accidents, infections and severe breathing problems. Monitors, intravenous (IV) tubes, feeding tubes, catheters, ventilators and other equipment are common in critical care units. These can sustain life but can also increase the risk of infection.

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Tracheostomy

A tracheostomy is a surgical procedure in which an opening is created in the front of the trachea (windpipe). A tracheostomy tube is inserted through the opening and into the trachea.

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Tracheotomy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Look up tracheotomy, pharyngotomy, laryngotomy, or tracheostomy in ..... A 2000 Spanish study of bedside percutaneous tracheostomy reported overall ...

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Tracheostomy Procedure Information by MedicineNet.com

Mar 11, 2011 ... Read about tracheostomy procedure, used to create an opening in the neck to bypass an obstructed airway, clean or remove secretions, ...

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Tracheostomy: eMedicine Clinical Procedures

Jun 7, 2010 ... Overview: Tracheostomy is an operative procedure that creates a surgical airway in the cervical trachea. The traditional semantic difference ...

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Tracheostomy definition - Medical Dictionary definitions of ...

Mar 13, 2011 ... Our Tracheostomy Main Article provides a comprehensive look at the who ... Tracheostomy may be part of the surgery required for patients who ...

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What is a tracheostomy?

A tracheostomy is a surgically made hole that goes through the front of your neck and into your trachea, or windpipe. The hole is made to help you breathe.

Read more on www.nhlbi.nih.gov

Tracheostomy Care

Airway reconstruction – Visit Cleveland Clinic's Head and Neck Institute if you would like to be treated for airway reconstruction or a tracheostomy.

Read more on my.clevelandclinic.org

Patient Information Series: Use of a Tracheostomy with a Child

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Contents

After the Procedure
If the tracheostomy is temporary, the tube will eventually be removed. Healing will occur quickly, leaving a minimal scar.

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Description
General anesthesia is used. The neck is cleaned and draped. Surgical cuts are made to expose the tough cartilage rings that make up the outer wall of the trachea. The surgeon then creates an opening into the trachea and inserts a tracheostomy tube.

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How it is performed
A planned tracheostomy is often carried out to deliver oxygen directly to your lungs. For example, it may be necessary to use a tracheostomy...

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How you prepare
How you prepare for a tracheostomy depends on the type of procedure you'll undergo. If you'll be receiving general anesthesia, your doctor may ask that you avoid eating and drinking for several hours before your procedure. You may also be asked to stop certain medications.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Indications
A tracheostomy may be done if you have:A large object blocking the airway; An inherited abnormality of the larynx or trachea; Breathed in harmful material such as smoke, steam, or other toxic gases; Cancer of the neck, which can affect breathing; Breathed in harmful material such as smoke or steam; Paralysis of the muscles that affect swallowing; Severe neck or mouth injuries

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Outlook (Prognosis)
Most patients require 1 to 3 days to adapt to breathing through a tracheostomy tube. It will take some time to learn how to communicate with others. Initially, it may be impossible for the patient to talk or make sounds.

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Recovery
Most people find that it takes some time to adapt to breathing through a tracheostomy tube. At first, you may find it difficult to talk or make sounds, but after some training and practice you should be able to talk with the tube in place.

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Results
After a tracheostomy, you breathe through the hole (stoma) in your neck, rather than through your nose or mouth.

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Risks
The risks for any anesthesia are:Problems breathing; Reactions to medications; Bleeding; Infection; Erosion of the trachea (rare); Nerve damage; Scar tissue in the trachea

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What you can expect
During tracheostomy Tracheostomy is most commonly performed in an operating room while using general anesthesia. But in certain situations, tracheostomy can be done in a hospital room using local anesthesia to numb the neck and throat. The type of procedure you undergo depends on the reason for your tracheostomy and whether it's planned or an emergency.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Why it's done
Situations that may call for a tracheostomy include: Emergency situations when you can't breathe on your own, and for various reasons doctors can't put a breathing tube through your mouth and into your windpipe (trachea). Paralysis or neurological problems that make it difficult to cough up phlegm and other secretions from your throat. Secretions can be suctioned out through the tracheostomy. A medical condition that requires long-term use of a machine to help you breathe. Before major head or neck surgery, to ensure you'll be able to breathe while you recover. As a precaution if a disease or condition threatens to block or narrow your airway, such as with vocal cord paralysis or mouth or throat cancer.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com