trauma

What is Trauma?


Wounds include cuts, scrapes, scratches and punctured skin. They often occur as a result of an accident or injury, but surgical incisions, sutures, and stitches also cause wounds. Minor wounds usually aren't serious, but even cuts and scrapes require care. To avoid infection and aid healing Serious and infected wounds require medical attention. You should also seek attention if the wound is deep, if you cannot close it yourself, if you cannot stop the bleeding or get the dirt out, or if it does not heal.

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Also known as Injuries, Injury, Wounds, Wound, Traumas, Wounds Injuries, Wounds and Injuries, Injuries and Wounds, Injury Wounds, Wounds and Injury, Injury and Wounds
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Trauma information from trusted sources:

Post-traumatic stress disorder

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has issued guidance on the treatment and care of people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Read more on www.nhs.uk

Trauma - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Trauma (plurals: traumata, traumas) can represent: [edit] Etymology. From Greek τρᾶυμα = "a wound", compare verb τιτρώσκω (stem τρω-) = "I injure" ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Trauma definition - Medical Dictionary definitions of popular ...

Mar 9, 2011 ... "Trauma" has both a medical and a psychiatric definition. ... Traumatology is the branch of surgery which deals with trauma patients and ...

Read more on www.medterms.com

Trauma

Trauma is an emotional response to a terrible event like an accident, rape or natural disaster. Reactions such as shock and denial are typical.

Read more on www.apa.org

Trauma Articles (Presentation, Treatment, Prognosis, Follow-up ...

Trauma articles covering presentation, treatment, prognosis, and follow-up. Peer reviewed and up-to-date recommendations written by leading experts.

Read more on emedicine.medscape.com

American College of Surgeons: Trauma Programs

2011 Trauma Quality Improvement Program (TQIP) Annual Scientific Meeting and Training will be in Chicago from November 13-15. Details will be posted online ...

Read more on www.facs.org

Trauma | Trauma Resource Center | Medscape

Traumatic injury is the leading cause of death worldwide among persons between 5 and 44 years of age and accounts for 10% of all deaths.

Read more on www.medscape.com

Contents

Injuries
An injury is damage to your body. It is a general term that refers to harm caused by accidents, falls, blows, burns, weapons and more. In the U.S., millions of people injure themselves every year. These injuries range from minor to life-threatening. Injuries can happen at work or play, indoors or outdoors, driving a car or walking across the street. Common injuries include

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Traumatic events
A traumatic event is an experience that causes physical, emotional, psychological distress, or harm. It is an event that is perceived and experienced as a threat to one's safety or to the stability of one's world. A traumatic event may involve: A move to a new location Anxiety Death of a friend, family member, or pet Divorce Fear Hospitalization Loss of trust Pain Physical injury or illness Separation from parents (perceived abandonment) Terrorism or mass disaster Violence or war

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Traumatic brain injury
Traumatic brain injury is usually the result of a sudden, violent blow to the head which launches the brain on a collision course with the inside of the skull. This collision can bruise the brain, tear nerve fibers and cause bleeding.

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Amputation - traumatic
Traumatic amputation is the loss of a body part -- usually a finger, toe, arm, or leg -- that occurs as the result of an accident or trauma.

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Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra
Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra involves damage caused by an outside force.

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Traumatic nasogastric or endotracheal intubation
Traumatic nasogastric or endotracheal intubation involves putting a tube through the nose into the trachea (airway) or into the stomach. Nasogastric tube placement is done to remove excess air, fluid, food, drugs, or poison from the stomach, or to deliver nutrients or drugs into the stomach. Endotracheal tube placement is done to maintain breathing or prevent aspiration (inhaling) of food into the airway. The term traumatic refers to tissue irritation or damage that occurs as a result of the procedure. Other complications may result if either type of tube is placed incorrectly.

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Trauma to the Head
Head injury is a general term used to describe any trauma to the head, and most specifically to the brain itself. Skull fracture: A skull fracture is a break in the bone surrounding the brain and other structures within the skull.

Post-traumatic stress disorder
After surviving a traumatic event, many people have PTSD-like symptoms at first, such as being unable to stop thinking about what's happened. Fear, anxiety, anger, depression, guilt all are common reactions to trauma. Although you may not want to talk about it to anyone or you don't want to even think about what's happened, getting support can help you recover. This may mean turning to supportive family and friends who will listen and offer comfort. It may mean that you seek out a mental health professional for a brief course of therapy. Some people also may find it helpful to turn to their faith community or a pastoral crisis counselor.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Spinal cord trauma
Evans RW, Wilberger JE, Bhatia S. Traumatic disorders. In: Goetz, CG, ed. Textbook of Clinical Neurology. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier, 2007: chap 51.

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Facial trauma
Maxillofacial injury, Midface trauma, Facial injury, LeFort injuries

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Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma
Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

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