tuberculosis

What is Tuberculosis?


Tuberculosis is caused by an organism called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria spread from person to person through microscopic droplets released into the air. This can happen when someone with the untreated, active form of tuberculosis coughs, speaks, sneezes, spits, laughs or sings. Rarely, a pregnant woman with active TB may pass the bacteria to her unborn child.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Also known as tb, Tuberculoses
Search for any health
topic on HealthMash:

Explore and Discover

Drugs and Substances
Alternative Medicine
» soy
» bladder
» nettle
» wheat

Tuberculosis information from trusted sources:

Safety and Health Topics: Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis and Respiratory Protection Enforcement. OSHA Standard Interpretation, (2008, March 24). Resumes full enforcement of the entire Respiratory ...

Read more on www.osha.gov

Tuberculosis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Tuberculosis or TB (short for tubercles bacillus) is a common and often deadly infectious disease caused by various strains of mycobacteria, ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) describes an infectious disease that has plagued humans since the Neolithic times. Two organisms cause tuberculosis -- Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis. Physicians in ancient Greece called this illness "phthisis" to reflect its wasting character. During the 17th and 18th centuries, TB caused up to 25% of all deaths in Europe. In more recent times, tuberculosis has been called "consumption."

Treatment of Tuberculosis American Thoracic Society, CDC, and ...

Jun 4, 2003 ... The recommendations in this document are intended to guide the treatment of tuberculosis in settings where mycobacterial cultures, ...

Read more on www.cdc.gov

USDA - APHIS - Animal Health - Tuberculosis

Jun 30, 2010 ... Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious disease of both animals and humans. It is caused by three specific types of bacteria that are part of the ...

Read more on www.aphis.usda.gov

Tuberculosis (Pulmonary Tuberculosis)-Symptoms, How It's Spread, Types

Apr 23, 2009 ... What is tuberculosis? Tuberculosis (TB) is a bacterial infection that is most often found in the lungs (pulmonary TB) but can spread to ...

Read more on www.webmd.com

TB

Tuberculosis (TB) is a bacterial infection caused by a germ called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body. TB spreads through the air when a person with TB of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes or talks. If you have been exposed, you should go to your doctor for tests. You are more likely to get TB if you have a weak immune system. Symptoms of TB in the lungs may include

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov

WHO | Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis, or TB, is an infectious bacterial disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which most commonly affects the lungs. ...

Read more on www.who.int

Tuberculosis

Oct 22, 2010 ... Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria. TB may affect many body organs but primarily ...

Read more on www.labtestsonline.org

Contents

Complications
Like most bacteria, mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria has the potential to develop a resistance to antibiotics.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Coping and support
Undergoing treatment for TB is a complicated and lengthy process. But the only way to cure the disease is to stick with your treatment. You may find it helpful to have your medication given by a nurse or other health care professional so that you don't have to remember to take it on your own. In addition, try to maintain your normal activities and hobbies and stay connected with family and friends.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Diagnosis
A diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) can usually be confirmed by carrying out a chest X-ray. If you have a TB infection, there should be changes to the appearance of your lungs that will be visible on the X-ray.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Preparing for your appointment
If you suspect that you have tuberculosis, contact your family doctor, a general practitioner or your state health department. You may be referred to an infectious disease or lung specialist (pulmonologist).

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Prevention
In general, TB is preventable. From a public health standpoint, the best way to control TB is to diagnose and treat people with TB infection before they develop active disease and to take careful precautions with people hospitalized with TB. But there also are measures you can take on your own to help protect yourself and others: Keep your immune system healthy. Eat plenty of healthy foods including fruits and vegetables, get enough sleep, and exercise at least 30 minutes a day most days of the week to keep your immune system in top form. Get tested regularly. Experts advise people who have a high risk of TB to get a skin test once a year. This includes people with HIV or other conditions...

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Risk factors
Anyone can get tuberculosis, but certain factors increase your risk of the disease. These factors include: Lowered immunity. A healthy immune system can often successfully fight TB bacteria, but your body can't mount an effective defense if your resistance is low. A number of factors can weaken your immune system. Having a disease that suppresses immunity, such as HIV/AIDS, diabetes, end-stage kidney disease, certain cancers or the lung disease silicosis, can reduce your body's ability to protect itself. Your risk is also higher if you take corticosteroids, certain arthritis medications, chemotherapy drugs or other drugs that suppress the immune system. Close contact with someone with infectious...

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Symptoms
Tuberculosis (TB) will not cause any symptoms until the infection has reached the lungs. As the bacteria are very slow moving, your symptoms might not begin for many years after the initial exposure to the bacteria has taken place.

Read more on www.nhs.uk
Treatment
If you are diagnosed with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), it is likely that you will be referred to a TB treatment team. This is a team of health professionals with experience in treating TB.

Read more on www.nhs.uk