vasectomy

What is Vasectomy?


You should be able to return home as soon as the procedure is done. You can return to work the next day if you do not do heavy physical work. Most men return to work within 2 to 3 days. You should be able to return to your normal physical activities in 3 to 7 days. It is normal to have some swelling and bruising of the scrotum after the procedure. It should go away within 2 weeks.

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Also known as sterilization, nsv, Vasectomies, Vas Occlusion, sterilization surgery - male, sterilization surgery – male, male sterilization surgery, Vas Ligation, Intravasal Thread, Vasectomy Seekers, Vasectomy Seeker, Vas Occlusions, Vas Ligations, Refused Vasectomy Seeker, Intravasal Threads, Nonchemical Vas Occlusion, Nonchemical Vas Occlusions, Refused Vasectomy Seekers
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Vasectomy

Vasectomy is a procedure in which the two tubes that carry sperm from the testicles to the urinary tract are surgically altered so sperm cannot pass through and be released to fertilize a woman's egg during sexual intercourse. For couples who have made the decision not to have any further children, vasectomy is the safest and easiest form of surgical sterilization. While reversible in many cases, vasectomy should be considered a permanent form of birth control. Vasectomy has grown in popularity throughout the world since its inception in the 19th century. About 600,000 men each year choose to undergo a vasectomy in the United States alone. Of those procedures, 85% of vasectomies are performed by urologists (specialists in men's health), and 15% are performed by family practitioners. The cost ranges from $300 to $1,000 and is frequently covered by insurance plans.

Vasectomy

Vasectomy is a simple surgery that provides birth control for men. A vasectomy prevents you from getting your partner pregnant by cutting and sealing the tubes that carry sperm into your semen. The surgery is straightforward and has a low risk of problems. For most men, a vasectomy doesn't cause any noticeable side effects. Before getting a vasectomy, you need to be sure you don't want to father a child in the future. Surgery to reverse a vasectomy is complicated and doesn't always restore fertility.

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Vasectomy

Birth control, also known as contraception, is designed to prevent pregnancy. Birth control methods may work in a number of different ways. These include Your choice of birth control should depend on several factors. These include your health, frequency of sexual activity, number of sexual partners and desire to have children in the future. Your health care provider can help you select the best form of birth control for you.

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Vasectomy

A vasectomy or 'male sterilisation' is a simple and reliable method of contraception. It is usually considered a permanent form of contraception, although in some cases the procedure can be reversed, if necessary, e.g. if you decide to have children later on in life.

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Vasectomy Procedure, Effects, Risks, Effectiveness, and More

May 22, 2008 ... A vasectomy is considered a permanent method of birth control. A vasectomy prevents the release of sperm when a man ejaculates.

Read more on www.webmd.com

Vasectomy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Vasectomy is a surgical procedure in which the vasa deferentia of a man are severed, and sometimes tied or sealed. Contents ...

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Vasectomy.com - Vasectomy and Reversal Information and Doctors

Find vasectomy and reversal doctors in your area. Learn all about less invasive options for male sterilization and reversals including no-scalpel ...

Read more on www.vasectomy.com

Vasectomy: What to Expect -- familydoctor.org

A vasectomy is an operation that makes a man permanently unable to get a woman pregnant. Learn how to prepare for and what to expect after the procedure.

Read more on familydoctor.org

Vasectomy Surgical Procedure Information on MedicineNet.com

Mar 10, 2011 ... A total of about 50 million men have had a vasectomy -- a number that ... Approximately half a million vasectomies are performed in the ...

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(c) UrologyHealth.org - Adult Conditions - Sexual Function - Vasectomy

With a conventional vasectomy, a urologist makes one or two small cuts in the skin of the scrotum to access the vas deferens. The vas deferens is cut, and a ...

Read more on www.urologyhealth.org

Contents

Before the Procedure
Two weeks before your vasectomy, tell your doctor all of the medicines, even ones you bought without a prescription, vitamins, supplements, and herbs you are taking. You may need to limit or stop taking aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), and other medicines that affect blood clotting for 10 days before your surgery.

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Complications
Following a vasectomy, complications are very rare. Most men can expect to feel sore and tender for a few days after the operation, and will usually experience some bruising and swelling on or around their scrotum.

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Cost
The cost of a vasectomy generally ranges between $350 and $1,000. Insurance companies vary on their coverage of the procedure, so check your policy ahead of time.

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Description
Vasectomy is usually done in the surgeon's office using local anesthesia. You will be awake but not feel any pain.

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How it is performed
A vasectomy is a quick and simple procedure that can be performed at...

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How you prepare
While some family medicine doctors do vasectomies, most are done by a urologist. Urologists are doctors with training in urinary and reproductive medicine.

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Indications
Vasectomy may be recommended for adult men who are sure they want to prevent future pregnancies. A vasectomy makes a man sterile (unable to get a woman pregnant). It does NOT prevent the spread of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

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Is it right for me
Having a vasectomy should always be viewed as permanent sterilisation. This is because, although reversal is sometimes possible, it takes delicate micro-surgery to join the tubes together again. Even when a surgeon successfully joins them, conception isn't always possible.

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Outlook (Prognosis)
Vasectomy does not affect a man's ability to have an erection or orgasm, or ejaculate semen.

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Recovery
Following a vasectomy, you will normally experience some mild discomfort, swelling and bruising of your scrotum. This will usually last for a few days.

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Results
After a vasectomy has been performed, some sperm will survive in the upper part of the vas deferens tubes. Until it has been confirmed that your semen is free of sperm, there is still a risk of pregnancy and you should continue to use another form of contraception.

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Risks
There is no serious risk to vasectomy. Your semen will be tested in the months after the operation to make sure it does not contain sperm.

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Schedule
You should only have a vasectomy if you are certain that you do not want to have any more children. If you have any doubts, you should consider an alternative method of contraception until you are completely sure.

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What you can expect
A vasectomy is usually done at a doctor's office or surgery center under local anesthesia, which means you'll be awake and have medicine to numb the surgery area.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com
Why it's done
Vasectomy is a good birth control choice for men who are certain they don't want to father a child.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com