vitamine

What is Vitamin E?


Vitamins are compounds that you must have for growth and health. They are needed in only small amounts and are available in the foods that you eat. Vitamin E prevents a chemical reaction called oxidation, which can sometimes result in harmful effects in your body. It is also important for the proper function of nerves and muscles.

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Also known as tocopherol, tocotrienols, key-e, e-400, alpha-e, e-600, e-gems
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Vitamin E information from trusted sources:

Vitamin E - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Vitamin E is a generic term for tocopherols and tocotrienols. Vitamin E is a family of α-, β-, γ-, and δ- (respectively: alpha, beta, gamma, ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Vitamin E Deficiency: eMedicine Endocrinology

Jul 9, 2008 ... Overview: Vitamin E, one of the most important lipid-soluble antioxidant nutrients, is found in nut oils, sunflower seeds, whole grains, ...

Read more on emedicine.medscape.com

Vitamin E

Jul 19, 2010 ... Vitamin E is a fat-soluble nutrient found in many foods. In the body, it acts as an antioxidant, helping to protect cells from the damage ...

Read more on ods.od.nih.gov

5. Vitamin E

The major biological role of vitamin E is to protect PUFAs and other com- ... Plasma vitamin E concentrations vary little over a wide range of dietary ...

Read more on whqlibdoc.who.int

Contents

Food Sources
Vitamin E is found in the following foods:Wheat germ ; Corn ; Nuts ; Seeds ; Olives ; Spinach and other green leafy vegetables ; Asparagus ; Vegetable oils -- corn, sunflower, soybean, cottonseed

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Function
Vitamin E is an antioxidant that protects body tissue from damage caused by unstable substances called free radicals. Free radicals can harm cells, tissues, and organs. They are believed to play a role in certain conditions associated with aging.

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Recommendations
The Food and Nutrition Board at the Institute of Medicine report the following dietary reference intakes for vitamin E:0 to 6 months: 4 mg/day; 7 to 12 months: 5 mg/day; 1 to 3 years: 6 mg/day; 4 to 8 years: 7 mg/day; 9 to 13 years: 11 mg/day; 14 and older: 15 mg/day

Read more on www.nlm.nih.gov
Side Effects
Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Read more on www.mayoclinic.com