wahoo

What is wahoo?


Wahoo is a deciduous shrub or small tree that grows up to 25 feet high. The bark is gray and its smooth, somewhat quadrangular branches bear opposite, elliptic, pointed leaves that are finely serrate and fine-haired underneath. Axillary cymes of 7 or more purple flowers appear during June. The fruit develops in October and is a scarlet, four-lobed capsule containing brown seeds with scarlet arils. Its most striking appearance is presented in winter, when its pale purple fruits have burst open and been exposed by the fallen leaves, all against a backdrop of glaring snow. It is this appearance which has earned it the nickname of burning bush. Wahoo can be recognized by the unusual structure of its fruit after the leaves drop in the autumn. For medicinal use, the bark should be gathered in the fall. The fruits may be attractive but they are considered poisonous and should not be used.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com
Also known as burning bush, euonymus, strawberry tree, spindle tree, indian arrow, arrow-wood, wauhoo, indian root, bitter ash, pegwood, indian arrowroot, indian arrow wood, whahow
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wahoo information from trusted sources:

Wahoo Bark

Wahoo Bark is an herbal medicine that is used for constipation (difficulty having a bowel movement) and gall bladder problems.

Read more on www.pdrhealth.com

Wahoo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The wahoo (Acanthocybium solandri) is a scombrid fish found worldwide in tropical and subtropical seas. It is best known to sports fishermen, ...

Read more on en.wikipedia.org

Wahoo Fitness Stride Sensor Review

Mar 7, 2011 ... Fisica Fitness App for Wahoo Fitness Sensor The Wahoo Fitness Stride Sensor is one of the nominees for our Computer-Linked Pedometer ...

Read more on walking.about.com

Wahoo Effectiveness, Safety, and Drug Interactions on rxlist

Wahoo information based on scientific evidence includes description, drug interactions, safety concerns, and effectiveness.

Read more on www.rxlist.com

Wahoo's Fish Taco Nutrition Facts, Calories, Fat, Protein & Diet ...

Wahoo's Fish Taco Calorie Tracker - calorie counter, nutrition facts, fitness tracker, calorie information & healthy alternatives to Wahoo's ...

Read more on www.livestrong.com

wahoo - definition of wahoo in the Medical dictionary - by the ...

n Latin name: Euonymus atropurpureus; parts used: bark, stem, root bark, stem bark, seed; uses: heart problems, induction of strong bowel movements, ...

Wahoo Effectiveness, How It Works, and Drug Interactions on ...

Wahoo information based on scientific evidence including how it works, safety concerns, scientific based what it is effective for and possible drug ...

WAHOO: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions and Warnings - WebMD

Find patient medical information for WAHOO on WebMD including its uses, effectiveness, side effects and safety, interactions, user ratings and products that ...

Read more on www.webmd.com

Saunders County Courthouse (Built 1904), Wahoo, Nebraska

Oct 28, 2008 ... Click for full image of Saunders County Courthouse (Built 1904), Wahoo, Nebraska Photo taken August 1973. Posted February 2000. ...

Read more on www.ers.usda.gov

Wahoo bark

Jan 4, 2010 ... Wahoo Bark is an herbal medicine that is used for constipation (difficulty having a bowel movement) and gall bladder problems. ...

Read more on www.allina.com

Contents

Whahow
Wahoo is a deciduous shrub or small tree that grows up to 25 feet high. The bark is gray and its smooth, somewhat quadrangular branches bear opposite, elliptic, pointed leaves that are finely serrate and fine-haired underneath. Axillary cymes of 7 or more purple flowers appear during June. The fruit develops in October and is a scarlet, four-lobed capsule containing brown seeds with scarlet arils. Its most striking appearance is presented in winter, when its pale purple fruits have burst open and been exposed by the fallen leaves, all against a backdrop of glaring snow. It is this appearance which has earned it the nickname of burning bush. Wahoo can be recognized by the unusual structure of its fruit after the leaves drop in the autumn. For medicinal use, the bark should be gathered in the fall. The fruits may be attractive but they are considered poisonous and should not be used.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com
Wauhoo
Wahoo is a deciduous shrub or small tree that grows up to 25 feet high. The bark is gray and its smooth, somewhat quadrangular branches bear opposite, elliptic, pointed leaves that are finely serrate and fine-haired underneath. Axillary cymes of 7 or more purple flowers appear during June. The fruit develops in October and is a scarlet, four-lobed capsule containing brown seeds with scarlet arils. Its most striking appearance is presented in winter, when its pale purple fruits have burst open and been exposed by the fallen leaves, all against a backdrop of glaring snow. It is this appearance which has earned it the nickname of burning bush. Wahoo can be recognized by the unusual structure of its fruit after the leaves drop in the autumn. For medicinal use, the bark should be gathered in the fall. The fruits may be attractive but they are considered poisonous and should not be used.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com
Strawberry tree
Wahoo is a deciduous shrub or small tree that grows up to 25 feet high. The bark is gray and its smooth, somewhat quadrangular branches bear opposite, elliptic, pointed leaves that are finely serrate and fine-haired underneath. Axillary cymes of 7 or more purple flowers appear during June. The fruit develops in October and is a scarlet, four-lobed capsule containing brown seeds with scarlet arils. Its most striking appearance is presented in winter, when its pale purple fruits have burst open and been exposed by the fallen leaves, all against a backdrop of glaring snow. It is this appearance which has earned it the nickname of burning bush. Wahoo can be recognized by the unusual structure of its fruit after the leaves drop in the autumn. For medicinal use, the bark should be gathered in the fall. The fruits may be attractive but they are considered poisonous and should not be used.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com
Spindle tree
Wahoo is a deciduous shrub or small tree that grows up to 25 feet high. The bark is gray and its smooth, somewhat quadrangular branches bear opposite, elliptic, pointed leaves that are finely serrate and fine-haired underneath. Axillary cymes of 7 or more purple flowers appear during June. The fruit develops in October and is a scarlet, four-lobed capsule containing brown seeds with scarlet arils. Its most striking appearance is presented in winter, when its pale purple fruits have burst open and been exposed by the fallen leaves, all against a backdrop of glaring snow. It is this appearance which has earned it the nickname of burning bush. Wahoo can be recognized by the unusual structure of its fruit after the leaves drop in the autumn. For medicinal use, the bark should be gathered in the fall. The fruits may be attractive but they are considered poisonous and should not be used.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com
Pegwood
Wahoo is a deciduous shrub or small tree that grows up to 25 feet high. The bark is gray and its smooth, somewhat quadrangular branches bear opposite, elliptic, pointed leaves that are finely serrate and fine-haired underneath. Axillary cymes of 7 or more purple flowers appear during June. The fruit develops in October and is a scarlet, four-lobed capsule containing brown seeds with scarlet arils. Its most striking appearance is presented in winter, when its pale purple fruits have burst open and been exposed by the fallen leaves, all against a backdrop of glaring snow. It is this appearance which has earned it the nickname of burning bush. Wahoo can be recognized by the unusual structure of its fruit after the leaves drop in the autumn. For medicinal use, the bark should be gathered in the fall. The fruits may be attractive but they are considered poisonous and should not be used.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com
Indian root
Wahoo is a deciduous shrub or small tree that grows up to 25 feet high. The bark is gray and its smooth, somewhat quadrangular branches bear opposite, elliptic, pointed leaves that are finely serrate and fine-haired underneath. Axillary cymes of 7 or more purple flowers appear during June. The fruit develops in October and is a scarlet, four-lobed capsule containing brown seeds with scarlet arils. Its most striking appearance is presented in winter, when its pale purple fruits have burst open and been exposed by the fallen leaves, all against a backdrop of glaring snow. It is this appearance which has earned it the nickname of burning bush. Wahoo can be recognized by the unusual structure of its fruit after the leaves drop in the autumn. For medicinal use, the bark should be gathered in the fall. The fruits may be attractive but they are considered poisonous and should not be used.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com
Indian arrow wood
Wahoo is a deciduous shrub or small tree that grows up to 25 feet high. The bark is gray and its smooth, somewhat quadrangular branches bear opposite, elliptic, pointed leaves that are finely serrate and fine-haired underneath. Axillary cymes of 7 or more purple flowers appear during June. The fruit develops in October and is a scarlet, four-lobed capsule containing brown seeds with scarlet arils. Its most striking appearance is presented in winter, when its pale purple fruits have burst open and been exposed by the fallen leaves, all against a backdrop of glaring snow. It is this appearance which has earned it the nickname of burning bush. Wahoo can be recognized by the unusual structure of its fruit after the leaves drop in the autumn. For medicinal use, the bark should be gathered in the fall. The fruits may be attractive but they are considered poisonous and should not be used.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com
Indian arrowroot
Wahoo is a deciduous shrub or small tree that grows up to 25 feet high. The bark is gray and its smooth, somewhat quadrangular branches bear opposite, elliptic, pointed leaves that are finely serrate and fine-haired underneath. Axillary cymes of 7 or more purple flowers appear during June. The fruit develops in October and is a scarlet, four-lobed capsule containing brown seeds with scarlet arils. Its most striking appearance is presented in winter, when its pale purple fruits have burst open and been exposed by the fallen leaves, all against a backdrop of glaring snow. It is this appearance which has earned it the nickname of burning bush. Wahoo can be recognized by the unusual structure of its fruit after the leaves drop in the autumn. For medicinal use, the bark should be gathered in the fall. The fruits may be attractive but they are considered poisonous and should not be used.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com
Indian arrow
Wahoo is a deciduous shrub or small tree that grows up to 25 feet high. The bark is gray and its smooth, somewhat quadrangular branches bear opposite, elliptic, pointed leaves that are finely serrate and fine-haired underneath. Axillary cymes of 7 or more purple flowers appear during June. The fruit develops in October and is a scarlet, four-lobed capsule containing brown seeds with scarlet arils. Its most striking appearance is presented in winter, when its pale purple fruits have burst open and been exposed by the fallen leaves, all against a backdrop of glaring snow. It is this appearance which has earned it the nickname of burning bush. Wahoo can be recognized by the unusual structure of its fruit after the leaves drop in the autumn. For medicinal use, the bark should be gathered in the fall. The fruits may be attractive but they are considered poisonous and should not be used.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com
Euonymus
Wahoo is a deciduous shrub or small tree that grows up to 25 feet high. The bark is gray and its smooth, somewhat quadrangular branches bear opposite, elliptic, pointed leaves that are finely serrate and fine-haired underneath. Axillary cymes of 7 or more purple flowers appear during June. The fruit develops in October and is a scarlet, four-lobed capsule containing brown seeds with scarlet arils. Its most striking appearance is presented in winter, when its pale purple fruits have burst open and been exposed by the fallen leaves, all against a backdrop of glaring snow. It is this appearance which has earned it the nickname of burning bush. Wahoo can be recognized by the unusual structure of its fruit after the leaves drop in the autumn. For medicinal use, the bark should be gathered in the fall. The fruits may be attractive but they are considered poisonous and should not be used.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com
Burning Bush
Wahoo is a deciduous shrub or small tree that grows up to 25 feet high. The bark is gray and its smooth, somewhat quadrangular branches bear opposite, elliptic, pointed leaves that are finely serrate and fine-haired underneath. Axillary cymes of 7 or more purple flowers appear during June. The fruit develops in October and is a scarlet, four-lobed capsule containing brown seeds with scarlet arils. Its most striking appearance is presented in winter, when its pale purple fruits have burst open and been exposed by the fallen leaves, all against a backdrop of glaring snow. It is this appearance which has earned it the nickname of burning bush. Wahoo can be recognized by the unusual structure of its fruit after the leaves drop in the autumn. For medicinal use, the bark should be gathered in the fall. The fruits may be attractive but they are considered poisonous and should not be used.

Read more on www.emedicinal.com